Korea Institute Undergraduate Research Assistantship

Application Deadline Extended to: Monday, March 21, 2022 5:00 p.m. EST
Applications due:
February 28, 2022, 11:59 p.m. EST

 

The Korea Institute will offer Undergraduate Research Assistantships for Korea focused projects supervised by Harvard faculty for summer 2022.  The RAships will be remote or hybrid. There will be a range of opportunities for Harvard undergraduates to work on faculty research projects in a variety of capacities. RAships are a great opportunity for students with little research experience to get hands-on exposure to the research world. Research Assistant positions offer unique possibilities for intellectual growth, while providing students with invaluable skills and experience. Work is arranged and directed by faculty members, who will directly supervise student RAs. The specifics of the intellectual goals for the student and the research tasks involved will vary. The student and faculty member will discuss and clarify in advance the research responsibilities and outcomes. Students may assist with data collection, data analysis, literature reviews, or other aspects of a faculty project. If awarded a KI Research Assistantship, the student will be paid $20 per hour (up to $2,000 total summer stipend per Assistantship) over 5-10 weeks, based on the needs of the faculty project.

Faculty project listings will be forthcoming in late January 2022 onwards. Please continue to check back.
 

Korea Institute Faculty offering Assistantships for Summer 2022:
Prof. Paul Chang
Associate Professor of Sociology, Dept. of Sociology
Email: paulchang@fas.harvard.edu
Project Title: ‘Reinventing Family: The Rise of Non-Normative Households in South Korea’ (2022)
Project Description: This project explores  the diversification of family structures in South Korea, including single-parent households, multicultural families, unmarried singles, and (the isolation of) senior citizens. Student research assistants will be asked to aid in coding interview transcripts, conducting literature reviews, and basic data analysis. The number of hours worked per week is flexible depending on student availability. Proficiency in reading Korean is necessary for this role.

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Dr. John Park
Director, Korea Project, Harvard Kennedy School
Email: John_Park@hks.harvard.edu; Faculty Bio: https://www.belfercenter.org/person/john-s-park
Project Title: Database of North Korean Cyber Operations (2022)
Assistantship Structure: Student compensation will be $20/hour over a 10-week period (10 hours/week) during 2022 summer.
Project Description: The selected RA will conduct research on North Korean cyber actors' practices, partners, and pathways to expand a database of these actors' activities in the areas of cyber heists of financial institutions, cryptocurrency exchange thefts, and cyber attacks on critical infrastructure. The RA will work directly with Dr. John Park, Director of the Korea Project at the Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center. Over the course of 10 weeks, the RA will build the database and write summary reports. The RA will also help prepare briefing memos for interviews with cyber security experts in the public, private, and academic sectors as well as conduct secondary research.
Desired Skills: The Korea Project team is seeking an RA with interest in cyber security and cryptocurrency. Korean language skills are a plus but not required. No web development skills required, but the RA will be asked to develop web content based on key findings from this research.
Application Info: Interested applicants are asked to submit a writing sample along with their resume. If the applicant has Korean language skills, please describe level (basic, intermediate, advanced).
Contact: John_Park@hks.harvard.edu

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Prof. Si Nae Park
Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
sinaepark@fas.harvard.edu
Project title: Reading in Premodern Korea (2022)
Project description: This project examines reading in premodern Korea with a focus on somatic and activity-based relationships with texts written in both sinographs (aka Chinese characters) and vernacular-script/Hangul writing. It aims to deepen our understanding of literacy, literature, and the human body with a focus on sound, the ear, and the voice. The undergraduate research assistant will be asked to aid in collecting, documenting, and organizing primary and secondary sources on representation of reading aloud, overhearing, and being read to in premodern Korea. Proficiency in reading Korean is required. Knowledge of premodern Korean history or literature is not required but preferred. Familiarity with sinographs is a plus.

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Prof. Karen Thornber
Harry Tuchman Levin Professor in Literature, Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Depts. of Comparative Literature and of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
thornber@fas.harvard.edu
Project Title: Health, Climate, and Gender/Sexuality Justice in Korea and the Korean Diaspora (2022)
Project Description: I’m doing preliminary research for a project that engages with overlaps among health (behavioral, mental, physical), climate change and climate justice, and gender/sexuality in Korea and the Korean diaspora, and in particular, how Korean and Korean diaspora literature, film, and other media engage with these topics.
The primary task of student research assistants will be to conduct literature reviews on these broad topics. Students also might be asked to provide commentary on differences between Korean sources and their English translations.
Native- or near-native fluency in reading Korean is required. Interest in health, climate, and/or gender/sexuality a plus, as is knowledge of other non-English languages. The number of hours (up to 100) and timing of the work is flexible, depending on student availability. The precise focus of the work is also flexible, depending on student interest.
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Prof. Hi-Sun Kim
Senior Preceptor in Korean
Director of the Korean Language Program, Dept. of EALC
hisun@fas.harvard.edu
'Language Transcription for the Korean Language Program' (2022)
Job Description: We are looking for students to transcribe recorded audio of spoken data of Korean language learners. The purpose of this data collection is to examine, assess, and identify patterns in language acquisition of Korean language learners through the current curriculum. Qualification: Student must be at the native (or near-native) level of Korean language. Background in linguistics or interest in (second) language acquisition and/or pedagogy is desirable. (approximately 50 hours / 6 -7 weeks)
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As FYI, the following were available faculty projects from summer 2021:

Prof. Paul Chang
Associate Professor of Sociology, Dept. of Sociology
paulchang@fas.harvard.edu
‘Reinventing Family: The Rise of Non-Normative Households in South Korea’ (2021)
This project explores  the diversification of family structures in South Korea, including single-parent households, multicultural families, unmarried singles, and (the isolation of) senior citizens. Student research assistants will be asked to aid in coding interview transcripts, conducting literature reviews, and basic data analysis. The number of hours worked per week is flexible depending on student availability. Proficiency in reading Korean is necessary for this role.
*

Prof. Nick Harkness
Professor of Anthropology, Dept. of Anthropology
harkness@fas.harvard.edu
'Korean Language, Culture, and Media' (2021)
Research assistant will transcribe, code, catalog, and analyze linguistic data from Korean-language media. Fluency in Korean is required. No previous training in linguistic methods or transcription software required. Weekly hours are flexible.
*

Prof. Si Nae Park
Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations sinaepark@fas.harvard.edu
Area of study: Korean Literature and Culture  Project title: 'Aurality and Social Practices of Reading in Korean Literature' Project (2021) description: I am a scholar of the literary culture and inscriptional practices of premodern Korea. Although we live in a world where reading means silent, private reading, in premodern Korea learning how to vocalize a text and/or having somebody read a text to you were integral to literacy and how people read, wrote, and appreciated literature. I am currently working on a book project to examine the roles of aurality—tentatively defined as both the vocalization of and listening to a text recited or read aloud by someone else—in reading as a means to better understand Korean literature within the context of the Sinographic Cosmopolis, a translocal literary formation that extended across East Asia and that privileged Literary Sinitic and sinographs. RA tasks, responsibilities, and learning outcomes: The undergraduate research assistant will work with a set of keywords and a bibliography, both of which will be prepared by the faculty mentor who welcomes the RA’s input, to conduct research using primary and/or secondary sources (depending on their Korean linguistic proficiency). The RA will gain a firsthand understanding of the early steps of research in a scholarly project. The RA will acquire knowledge about the Korean literary tradition and approaches to the history of reading and book history. The RA will cultivate research skills and an ability to organize, document, and visualize findings through regular meetings with the faculty mentor. Reading ability in Korean is required. No knowledge of premodern Korean history or literature is required. Familiarity with sinographs (aka Chinese characters) is a plus, although not required. Work length: $20/hour; start date early June 2021; a minimum of 10 hours/week; 10 weeks or less depending on the RA’s progress (maximum compensation is $2,000).
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Prof. Hi-Sun Kim
Senior Preceptor in Korean
Director of the Korean Language Program, Dept. of EALC
hisun@fas.harvard.edu
'Language Transcription for the Korean Language Program' (2021)
Job Description: We are looking for students to transcribe recorded audio of spoken data of Korean language learners. The purpose of this data collection is to examine, assess, and identify patterns in language acquisition of Korean language learners through the current curriculum. Qualification: Student must be at the native (or near-native) level of Korean language. Background in linguistics or interest in (second) language acquisition and/or pedagogy is desirable. (approximately 50 hours / 6 -7 weeks)
*

Prof. John Park
Director of the Korea Project and Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center
John_Park@hks.harvard.edu
'Database of North Korean Hacker Activities' (2021)
Assistantship Structure: Student compensation will be $20/hour over a 10-week period (10 hours/week) during 2021 summer.
Description: The selected RA will conduct research on North Korean hackers' practices, partners, and pathways in compiling a database of these actors' activities in the areas of cyber heists of financial institutions, cryptocurrency exchange thefts, and cyber attacks on critical infrastructure. The RA will work directly with Dr. John Park, director of the Korea Project at the Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center. Over the course of 10 weeks, the RA will build the database and write summary reports. The RA will also help prepare briefing memos for interviews with cyber security experts in the public, private, and academic sectors as well as conduct secondary research.
Desired Skills: The Korea Project team is seeking an RA with interest in cyber security and cryptocurrency. Korean language skills are a plus. No web development skills required, but the RA will be asked to develop web content based on key findings from this research.
Application Info: Interested applicants are asked to submit a writing sample along with their resume. If the applicant has Korean language skills, please describe level (basic, intermediate, advanced).
*

Prof. Jeannie Suk Gersen
John H. Watson, Jr. Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
jsg@law.harvard.edu
'Korean Constitutionalism and Rule of Law' (2021)
Description: Project explores Korean constitutional and other contemporary legal debates in order to study the rule-of-law implications for a range of challenges in Korean society, including presidential power, gender equality, corruption, North Korea, and U.S.-Korea relations. Native or near-native ability to read, write about, and translate Korean language texts is required.
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Prof. Haden Guest
Director, Harvard Film Archive; Senior Lecturer, Department of Art, Film, and Visual Studies
hguest@fas.harvard.edu
'HFA Korean Cinema Project' (2021)
The Harvard Film Archive (HFA) will be organizing and presenting in partnership with the Korea Institute and the new Korean Diaspora Initiative, a series of virtual and in-person screenings and events during the 2021-22 academic year. We will need a research and curatorial assistant, to work a total of ten hours a week for approximately eight weeks this summer. Tasks will include researching films and print sources, as well as, shaping the programs themselves, in consultation with the HFA.

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Students should reach out to individual faculty members to inquire about their RA opportunities, scope, and duties. Students may apply for only one KI research assistantship opportunity. For questions about specific projects, please contact the professor directly.

Applications due: February 28, 2022, 11:59 p.m. EST-- Deadline extended to March 21, 2022 5pm EST

Please note: You are ineligible to apply if you are on a Leave of Absence during AY21-22/Spring Term 2022.

 

To Apply:

First, reach out to individual faculty to learn more about each faculty RAship.

  1. To apply, email the following information to each faculty sponsor of an RAship before the deadline
    (February 28, 2022, 11:59 p.m. EST)-- Deadline extended to March 21, 2022 5pm EST
  • Full name (first, LAST)
  • Email Address/es
  • Current physical address and citizenship
  • Concentration; class year
  • Korean language proficiency level (if any)
  • Financial Aid status (recipient or not)
  • 1-2 paragraphs explaining reasons for interest in the project; and
  • 1-2 paragraphs describing relevant coursework (if any), relevant work/research experience (if any), or reasons for interest in learning more about research via this project.
  • Budget: Include the number of available work hours per week, the number of weeks available to work, the earliest beginning date and latest end date. Please note: Living/travel/equipment expenses may not be included.
  1. Faculty will review applications. Faculty may invite final candidates to interview via Zoom.
  2. Ordinarily, faculty are expected to contact selected students by email within two weeks after application is submitted.
  3. Please ACCEPT or DECLINE faculty offers by email within 1 week of offer, with copy to cglover@fas.harvard.edu. Please include all project details.
  4. The KI will contact students to process compensation.
  5. KI Undergraduate Research Assistantship awardees will submit to the Korea Institute a 1-2-page written report detailing the RAship experience, along with a photo of yourself and/or your work, by August 31, 2022. Awardees will also be expected to give a presentation and speak with students on the RAship experience at an information session during the 2022-23 academic year and become an ambassador for this program.

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Harvard College 2022 Summer Funding Policy oue.fas.harvard.edu/summer-2022-funding-policy

Harvard College prioritizes the wide distribution of Summer funding to ensure that as many undergraduate students as possible can have a meaningful summer experience. For funded Summer 2022 experiences, students may only apply Harvard University funding to one Summer experience, regardless of duration of time (ex. only four weeks or a part-time effort). Co-funding between multiple sources of funding is permitted only if the funding jointly supports the same Summer experience.

Exceptions to the Summer Funding Policy are uncommon and will be reviewed on an individual basis; students should make exception requests to their Resident Dean, who will forward on to the Office of Undergraduate Education. All exceptions will be approved by the Office of Undergraduate Education.

Failure to adhere to the Harvard College Summer funding policy may result in a student being referred to the Administrative Board or Honor Council.