Special Events, Workshops and Conferences

2021 Apr 22

The Korean Vernacular Story: Telling Tales of Contemporary Chosŏn in Sinographic Writing

4:30pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

Book Talk
4.22 Professor Si Nae Park's Book Talk Poster

Si Nae Park
Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Discussant:
Wiebke Denecke, Visiting Professor of East Asian Literatures, MIT

Chaired by Karen Thornber, Harry Tuchman Levin Professor in Literature and Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University; Acting Director, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Fall 2020

***
To attend this event online, we ask that you please register via the following link:
https://forms.gle/s5VFmKgi1qfGBi4TA

As we approach the event date, you will receive a reminder email with the Zoom link.
***

2020 Dec 01

North Korea’s Information and Technology: The Inflow of Foreign Content and the Regime’s Countermeasures

4:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

Korea Project Event

REGISTER: Click HERE

The North Korean regime has traditionally controlled information production, circulation, and consumption. However, over the years, foreign information and content have continued to trickle into the country. This phenomenon has major social and foreign policy implications. Our panelists will discuss how outside actors are getting content into North Korea, how the regime has responded with countermeasures, what kind of macro and micro impact foreign information consumption has on North Korean society, and why these trends are consequential.

Join us for this Zoom Webinar event.

The Belfer Center’s Korea Project and the Carr Center’s Technology & Human Rights Program are co-sponsoring this event.

4:00 PM  Welcoming Remarks
Speaker: Dr. John Park (Director, Korea Project, Harvard Belfer Center)

Opening Remarks
Speaker: Sushma Raman (Executive Director, Carr Center, Harvard Belfer Center)

4:05 PM  Panel Discussion
Moderator: Dr. John Park (Director, Korea Project, Harvard Kennedy School)
Panelists: Dr. Jieun Baek (Founder and Co-Director, Lumen & Fellow, Belfer Center, Harvard Kennedy School); Markus Garlauskas (Non-Resident Senior Fellow, Scowcroft Center, Atlantic Council); Geum-Hyok Kim (Student, Korea University); Nat Kretchun (Vice President for Programs, Open Technology Fund); Martyn Williams (Fellow, Stimson Center)

4:30 PM  Q&A

For more information: Belfer Center

... Read more about North Korea’s Information and Technology: The Inflow of Foreign Content and the Regime’s Countermeasures

2020 Nov 18

East Asia Responds to U.S. Election Results

7:30pm to 8:30pm

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

Sponsored by the WCFIA Program on U.S.-Japan Relations; co-sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, the Harvard University Asia Center, and the Korea Institute.

Toshihiro Nakayama
Professor of American Politics and Foreign Policy, Faculty of Policy Management, Keio University; Adjunct Fellow, Japan Institute of International Affairs

Shin-wha Lee
Professor, Department of Political Science and International Relations, Korea University

Wu Xinbo
Dean, Institute of International Studies; Director, Center for American Studies; Fudan University

Discussant:
Ezra Vogel
Honorary Director, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations; Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences, Emeritus, Harvard University

Moderated by Christina Davis, Director, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations; Professor of Government; and Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

Please register here.

2021 Apr 01

There Are No Shortcuts: The Korean War and the African American Struggle for Civil Rights

6:00pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

SBS Seminar; co-sponsored by the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research (This event is part of the Race and Racism in Asia and Beyond Series, co-sponsored by the Harvard Asia Center, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Program on US-Japan Relations, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies)
4.1 SBS Seminar Poster


Mitchell Lerner
Professor of History; Director, East Asian Studies Center, The Ohio State University

Mitchell Lerner is professor of history at The Ohio State University, and director of the East Asian Studies Center. His research and teaching focus is on modern American diplomatic and political history during the Cold War, with an emphasis on U.S.-Korean relations.

Lerner's first book, The Pueblo Incident: A Spy Ship and the Failure of American Foreign Policy, was published in 2002 by the University Press of Kansas. The book won the 2002 John Lyman Book Award for the best work of U.S. Naval History, and was named by the American Library Association as one of 50 "historically significant works" that would not have been published after the passage of Executive Order 13233. It was also nominated for the Pulitzer and Bancroft Prizes. He is also editor of three volumes that work at the intersection of American politics and foreign policy.

He has published articles about modern American politics and foreign policy (often with a Korean focus) in numerous anthologies and journals, including Diplomatic History, Diplomacy & Statecraft, the Journal of Military HistoryPresidential Studies Quarterly, Journal of East Asian Affairs; Journal of Cold War Studies, and the Journal of East Asian Relations. He is currently at work on a policy history of the Johnson administration, as well as a broad study of U.S.-Korean relations during the Cold War.

Lerner was elected to the governing council of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations in 2008, and is on the advisory board of the North Korea International Documentation Project, directed by the Cold War International History Project at the Wilson Center for Scholars. He has also served as a fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center for Public Affairs, and in 2005-06 he held the Mary Ball Washington Distinguished Fulbright Chair at University College-Dublin. In 2019, he was selected to the Association of Asian Studies’ Distinguished Speakers Bureau, and also delivered the National Security Agency’s Center for Cryptologic History annual Henry Schorrek Memorial Lectures.

Lerner has received fellowships and grants from the Korea Foundation, Lyndon Johnson Presidential Library, Dwight Eisenhower Presidential Library, and John F. Kennedy Presidential Library. He has served as editor of Passport: The Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations Review, and is now associate editor of the Journal of American-East Asian Relations. In 2005, Lerner won the Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching, and in 2019, he won the Ohio Academy of History Distinguished Teacher Prize.

Chaired by Nicholas HarknessProfessor of Anthropology, Harvard University

Abstract:
The relationship between the Korean War and the African American civil rights movement is one that has been largely overlooked in the historical literature. This presentation traces the struggles of the African American community during the war, focusing in particular on the battlefield experiences of African American soldiers, to conclude that Korea served as a pivotal moment in directing the civil rights effort towards the more overtly aggressive posture that is commonly associated with the war in Vietnam. This talk will suggest that the experiences of African American soldiers along the 38th parallel provided a critical step towards the increased disillusionment and militancy of the subsequent decade.

***
To attend this event online, we ask that you please register via the following link:
https://forms.gle/j4BEYTuRWpWd8Ldz9

As we approach the event date, you will receive a reminder email with the Zoom link.
***

2020 Nov 13

The Big Data Turn in the Humanities: Sailing into Uncharted Waters

10:00am to 11:00am

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

East Asian Digital Scholarship Series; co-sponsored by Harvard-Yenching Library, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, and Korea Institute


Javier Cha (Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies, College of Liberal Studies, Seoul National University; Visiting Scholar and Digital Historian-in-Residence, Department of History, Lingnan University)

The total amount of data created by 2020, if stored in a stack of single-layer Blu-ray discs, would reach seven times the distance between the Earth and the Moon. In 2019 alone, content creators uploaded 30,000 years of video to YouTube, and Naver's flagship data center, Kak, handles more information than ten thousand National Libraries of Korea combined. By 2025, big data will triple in size, and the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated this growth. To meet this demand, China is aggressively increasing its data center capacity, as seen in Guizhou's recent transformation into Big Data Valley and Alibaba Cloud's expansion in Southeast Asia. What are the implications of this ongoing big data transformation of society in the humanities? In this talk, Javier Cha argues for the need to fundamentally rethink the humanities, from material bibliography to data analytics and cultural studies. What do we do when our sources consist of millions of servers rather than documents? How do we handle cultural artifacts that increasingly eschew text in favor of video, 3d point clouds, and holograms? Questions of this nature are at the heart of Cha's Big Data Studies Lab at Seoul National University, which has invited librarians, historians, anthropologists, and computer scientists, among others, to search for the new normal in the humanities together. Our current proposal is to develop big data literacy and cultural data science curricula for the next generation of humanities scholars.

The East Asian Digital Scholarship Series, founded by Feng-en Tu and Sharon Yang, has been a monthly luncheon at Harvard-Yenching Library. This year, the Series will be conducted remotely and is sponsored by Harvard-Yenching Library with the support of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, and Korea Institute. The Series will cover a wide range of topics in East Asian digital scholarship.


The webinar will be conducted via Zoom. Participants will be required to register at https://link.ws/eads-nov20.

... Read more about The Big Data Turn in the Humanities: Sailing into Uncharted Waters

2020 Oct 15

Through the Looking Glass: Chinese Open Source Assessments of North Korea’s Ballistic Missile Capabilities

3:00pm to 4:30pm

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

Korea Project Event

REGISTER: Click HERE

Foreign researchers have increasingly leveraged advanced open source intelligence technology and cooperated across countries to track North Korea’s developments over the last 25 years.  But one country has been left out – China.  Are there open source Chinese analyses of DPRK ballistic missiles, do they align with U.S. assessments, and is there anything for other researchers to gain from reading these analyses?  This report by Nathan Beauchamp-Mustafaga and Dr. Scott W. Harold examines Chinese assessments of North Korean ballistic missile capabilities between 1998 and 2017. 

3:00 PM  Welcoming Remarks
Speaker: Dr. John Park (Director, Korea Project, Harvard Belfer Center)

3:05 PM  Panel Discussion
Moderator: Dr. John Park (Director, Korea Project, Harvard Kennedy School)
Discussant: Dr. Ariel Petrovics (Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard Belfer Center)
Speakers: Nathan Beauchamp-Mustafaga (Policy Analyst, RAND Corporation); Dr. Scott W. Harold (Senior Political Scientist, RAND Corporation)

4:00 PM  Q&A

For more information: Belfer Center

... Read more about Through the Looking Glass: Chinese Open Source Assessments of North Korea’s Ballistic Missile Capabilities

2020 Oct 07

3rd Annual Destination: World Event, Powered by PechaKucha

2:15pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Online Event (Livestream)

Worldwide Week at Harvard 2020

Join the LIVESTREAM at: https://worldwide.harvard.edu/24hh-24-hours-harvard

We invite you to join us at 24 Hours of Harvard hosted by Harvard's Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs. The Korea Institute is co-sponsoring along with several of Harvard’s international centers Destination: World, featuring presentations by Harvard College students on their activities abroad.

From Hong Kong to Rwanda and around the globe, come learn how international experiences have shaped the lives of Harvard undergraduates. Eleven students share their inspirational stories about global engagement, intellectual exploration and personal discovery made possible through experiences abroad.

2020 Oct 15

What South Korea Teaches the World About Fighting COVID-19

6:00pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

SBS Seminar; co-sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center, COVID in Asia Series, and the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute


Doug J. Chung
MBA Class of 1962 Associate Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Doug J. Chung is the MBA Class of 1962 Associate Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. He teaches Sales Management & Strategy in the second year MBA Elective Curriculum and chairs the Executive Education program, Managing Sales Teams and Distribution Channels. He has previously taught in various Executive Education programs at the Harvard Business School and Harvard Law School.

Professor Chung focuses his research primarily on sales strategy, sales force management and incentive compensation. He has worked with firms worldwide to develop effective employee incentive compensation systems and his work has been published in various academic journals.

Professor Chung earned his Ph.D. in management at Yale University, where he also earned an M.A. and M.Phil. in management. He was the finalist for the 2014 John D. C. Little Award, the 2015 Frank M. Bass Award, and the 2020 Gary L. Lilien Practice Prize. He was selected as a 2017 MSI Young Scholar by the Marketing Science Institute. Professor Chung serves on the editorial board at major academic journals, including Marketing ScienceJournal of Marketing Research, and the International Journal of Research in Marketing. He currently serves as a Senior Advisor for McKinsey & Company’s sales and marketing practices. He completed his undergraduate studies at Korea University. Prior to pursuing a career in academics, Professor Chung served as a platoon commander in the South Korean Special Warfare Command.

Abstract: 
In a world devastated by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) has been able to effectively combat the disease without ever imposing a full lockdown of its economy. How did the country accomplish its success?

South Korea initially had the largest number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 outside of China, but new cases have decreased sharply since then. As of October 12, South Korea reported 24,703 cumulative cases and 433 deaths, which dwarfs those reported by other developed countries. Even taking into account the country’s population, South Korea’s number of cases per capita is substantially lower than those of other countries. The United States (with more than 8 million cumulative cases) has 24,386 cases per million citizens whereas South Korea has 478 cases per million.

This talk will go through the details of how South Korea was able to control Covid-19 and what policy makers and business leaders can learn from it.

Chaired by Sun Joo Kim, Harvard-Yenching Professor of Korean History; Director, Korea Institute, Harvard University

***
To attend this event online, we ask that you please register via the following link:
https://forms.gle/447rwpbyMrsXNjqk6

As we approach the event date, you will receive a reminder email with the Zoom link.
***

Generously supported by the SBS Research Fund at the Korea Institute, Harvard University

2020 Oct 06

The 2020 U.S. Presidential Election and Implications for North Korea Policy

9:00am to 10:30am

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

Jointly sponsored by the Korea Project and the ROK Consulate General in Boston


RSVP: Click HERE

9:00 AM  Welcoming Remarks
Speaker: Dr. John Park (Director, Korea Project, Harvard Belfer Center)

Opening Remarks
Speaker: Consul General Yonghyon Kim (ROK Consulate General in Boston)

9:05 AM  Panel Discussion
Moderator: Dr. John Park (Director, Korea Project, Harvard Kennedy School)
Speakers: Dr. Patrick Cronin (Asia-Pacific Security Chair, Hudson Institute); Jessica Lee (Senior Research Fellow, Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft); Mark Tokola (Vice President, Korea Economic Institute); Jenny Town (Fellow and Deputy Director, 38 North, Stimson Center)

10:00 AM  Q&A

For more information: Belfer Center

... Read more about The 2020 U.S. Presidential Election and Implications for North Korea Policy

2020 Oct 14

Dynamic Korea and Rhythmic Form: Samul Nori's Global Circulations

7:00pm

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

Music Abroad Seminar Series; sponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard University and co-sponsored by the Korea Institute


Katherine In-Young Lee
Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music

***
Instructions how to join the event:

  1. Have a Zoom account. Members of the Harvard community who have not yet set up their Zoom account can follow the instructions provided by Harvard to set up an account. Guests without a Zoom account can set up an account for free.
  2. Please provide your name and email on the registration page to register to this event.

    After registering, you should receive the confirmation link to your e-mail. If you have any questions or difficulty, please contact Samantha Jones at samanthajones@g.harvard.edu

***
Abstract:
In this lecture, Katherine In-Young Lee discusses research from her recently published book, Dynamic Korea and Rhythmic Form (Wesleyan University Press 2018). Dynamic Korea explores how the percussion genre known as samul nori—created in 1978 in South Korea—came to be a global music genre. In many ways, samul nori can be viewed as one of South Korea’s first successful cultural exports, traveling well before the advent of K-pop. Based on both ethnographic research and close formal analysis, this lecture gives attention to the kinetic experience of samul nori, drawing out the concept of dynamism to show its historical, philosophical, and pedagogical dimensions. In tandem with this analysis she will highlight one of the case studies in her book—a Korean percussion ensemble based in the Twin Cities, Minnesota. This community ensemble has included Korean adoptees and their adoptive American families, recent Korean immigrants, Korean Americans, and non-Koreans since its founding in 2004.

Katherine In-Young Lee is Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music. Her research interests include East Asia, Korean music and culture, music and politics, sound studies, ethnography, historiography, transnational adoption, and global circulations of form. She studied at the University of Michigan (B.M./B.M.), the University of Washington (M.A.), and Harvard University (Ph.D.). Her book, Dynamic Korea and Rhythmic Form (Wesleyan University Press 2018), explores how a percussion genre from South Korea (samul nori) became a global music genre. More broadly, she contends that rhythm-based forms serve as a critical site for cross-cultural musical encounters. Dynamic Korea and Rhythmic Form was recently recognized with the 2019 Béla Bartók Award for Outstanding Ethnomusicology from the ASCAP Foundation (Deems Taylor/Virgil Thomson Awards). Lee’s research on the role of music at scenes of protest during South Korea’s democratization movement was awarded the Charles Seeger Prize by the Society for Ethnomusicology and the Martin Hatch Award by the Society for Asian Music. Previously, she taught as an Assistant Professor at the University of California, Davis (2012-17).

https://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/event/dynamic-korea-and-rhythmic-form-samul-noris-global-circulations

 

... Read more about Dynamic Korea and Rhythmic Form: Samul Nori's Global Circulations

2020 Sep 25

Long Live the Digital Scholarship Project

10:00am to 11:15am

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

East Asian Digital Scholarship Series; co-sponsored by Harvard-Yenching Library, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, and Korea Institute



Peter Bol (Harvard University, China Biographical Database)
Grace Fong (McGill University, Ming-Qing Women’s Writings)
Andrew Gordon (Harvard University, Japan Disasters Digital Archive Project)
Helen Hardacre (Harvard University, Constitutional Revision Research Project)

It is difficult to start a digital scholarship project. Maintaining it for decades is even more difficult. In this year’s first forum of the East Asian Digital Scholarship Series, we invite the founders of four long-running North American-based projects. Peter Bol, Grace Fong, Andrew Gordon, and Helen Hardacre will share their experiences in building and leading digital scholarship projects.

The East Asian Digital Scholarship Series, founded by Feng-en Tu and Sharon Yang, has been a monthly luncheon at Harvard-Yenching Library. This year, the Series will be conducted remotely and is sponsored by Harvard-Yenching Library with the support of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, and Korea Institute. The Series will cover a wide range of topics in East Asian digital scholarship.


The webinar will be conducted via Zoom. Participants will be required to register at http://bit.ly/EADS2020_1

... Read more about Long Live the Digital Scholarship Project

2021 Mar 04

Books, Flowers, and Objects: Beauty, Inspiration, and Aspiration in Korean Ch’aekkŏri Screens

6:00pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

Korean Treasures at Harvard Series IV
3.4 Korean Treasures Poster

Sunglim Kim
Associate Professor of Korean Art History at Dartmouth College

Sunglim Kim is an Associate Professor in the Department of Art History and Asian Societies, Cultures, and Languages (ASCL) Program at Dartmouth College. Her research interests include pre-modern and 20th-century Korean painting, cultural exchanges between Korea and the world, and women and gender matters in Korean art. She is the author of a book, Flowering Plums and Curio Cabinets: The Culture of Objects in Late Chosŏn Korean Art, and numerous articles. She is currently organizing a traveling exhibition on the contemporary Korean ink painter Park Dae-Sung in the United States and is writing a book on that painter. Kim is also preparing a book on women artists and art movements in modern and contemporary Korea.  

Chaired by Sun Joo Kim, Harvard-Yenching Professor of Korean History; Director, Korea Institute, Harvard University

Abstract:
First appearing in the late 18th century, ch’aekkŏri is a genre of Korean still life painting depicting books, ceramics, antiques, plants, fruits, and other objects. Ch’aekkŏri screens arose with the flourishing of material culture in the late Chosŏn dynasty, and were used to represent their owners’ wealth, status, and aspirations through the represented objects. Simultaneously, artists began to employ mass production techniques to meet the high demand for this new art form. There are three types of ch’aekkŏri: “bookshelf,” “tabletop,” and “isolated.” In this talk, we will see how Korean painters produced tabletop ch’aekkŏri, by looking at extant underdrawings and comparing them with various ch’aekkŏri screens that may have been produced based on them. We also will closely examine the isolated ch’aekkŏri screen in the Harvard Art Museums collection, exploring its aesthetics, symbolism, and social context. 

  • Short presentations on Harvard collections, art and rare books. 
    • Followed by live Q/A

***
To attend this event online, we ask that you please register via the following link:
https://forms.gle/P9FuxCh8NN2qgijJ9

As we approach the event date, you will receive a reminder email with the Zoom link.
***

2021 Feb 11

Images of the Ten Kings of Hell and Kṣitigarbha Bodhisattva dating from the Koryŏ (918-1392) and Chosŏn (1392-1910)

6:00pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

Korean Treasures at Harvard Series III


Maya Stiller
Associate Professor, Korean Art and Visual Culture, University of Kansas

Chaired by Sun Joo Kim, Harvard-Yenching Professor of Korean History; Director, Korea Institute, Harvard University

  • Short presentations on Harvard collections, art and rare books. 
    • Followed by live Q/A

***
To attend this event online, we ask that you please register via the following link:
https://forms.gle/28mxLUmZWXjT7HRn9

As we approach the event date, you will receive a reminder email with the Zoom link.
***

2020 Nov 19

Three "Plants and Insects” Paintings Attributed to Sin Saimdang (1504-1551)

6:00pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

Korean Treasures at Harvard Series II


Si Nae Park
Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Chaired by Sun Joo Kim, Harvard-Yenching Professor of Korean History; Director, Korea Institute, Harvard University
 

  • Short presentations on Harvard collections, art and rare books. 
    • Followed by live Q/A

***
To attend this event online, we ask that you please register via the following link:
https://forms.gle/QSbFAUKRLmBAtdQq6

As we approach the event date, you will receive a reminder email with the Zoom link.
***

2020 Sep 17

The Yu Tae-ch’ing Family Documents: Introduction and the Mutual Agreement of the Division of Property

6:00pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Online Event (Zoom)

Korean Treasures at Harvard Series I; co-sponsored by Harvard-Yenching Institute and Harvard-Yenching Library
 


Sun Joo Kim
Harvard-Yenching Professor of Korean History; Director, Korea Institute

  • Short presentations on Harvard collections, art and rare books. 
    • 10-15 minutes pre-recorded showing followed by live Q/A

***
To attend this event online, we ask that you please register via the following link:
https://forms.gle/UzPA6w5jzjPuttt77

As we approach the event date, you will receive a reminder email with the Zoom link.
***

Pages