Events

    2019 Dec 06

    Modern and Contemporary Korean Art: Continuity and Transformation

    9:00am to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Porte Seminar Room (S250), CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, MA 02138

    2019 Harvard University Korean Art History Workshop

    Schedule TBA

    Organized by Sun Joo Kim, Harvard-Yenching Professor of Korean History; Director, Korea Institute, Harvard University, and Sunglim Kim, Associate Professor in the Department of Art History and Asian Societies, Cultures, and Languages Program, Dartmouth College

    The Korea Institute acknowledges the generous support of the Edward Willett Wagner Memorial Fund.

    2019 Nov 14

    A Sublime Disaster: The Sewŏl Ferry Incident and the Politics of the Living Dead

    4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Thomas Chan-Soo Kang Room (S050), CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, MA 02138

    Korea Colloquium

    Hyun Ok Park
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, York University

    With archival and ethnographic research, her research investigates global capitalism in colonial, industrial, and financial forms, democracy, socialism, and post-socialist transition, especially in terms of the experience of laborers, ethnic and diasporic minorities, and refugees. These areas of focus have led her to engage with the critical theory of modernity and otherness, postcolonialism, and transnational and global history, to which she ...

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    2019 Oct 31

    Talk Title TBA

    4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Thomas Chan-Soo Kang Room (S050), CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, MA 02138

    Kim Koo Forum on Korea Current Affairs

    Monica Kim
    Assistant Professor of History, New York University

    Chaired by Nicholas Harkness, Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University

    The Korea Institute acknowledges the generous support of the Kim Koo Foundation.

    2019 Oct 17

    Talk Title TBA

    4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Thomas Chan-Soo Kang Room (S050), CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, MA 02138

    Kim Koo Forum on Korea Current Affairs

    Michael Kim
    Professor of Korean History, Yonsei University

    Professor Kim received an A.B. in History with honors and Magna Cum Laude from Dartmouth College and his Ph.D. in Korean history from Harvard University's East Asian Languages and Civilizations Department. His specialty is colonial Korean history, particularly in print culture, migration, wartime mobilization and everyday life. He has published over thirty articles, translations and book chapters on various topics in Korean history. His recent publication...

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    2019 Oct 07

    Talk Title TBA

    4:30pm

    Location: 

    Porte Seminar Room (S250), CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, MA 02138

    Science and Technology in Asia Seminar Series; sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center and co-sponsored by the Korea Institute

    Jung Lee
    Associate Professor, Institute for the Humanities, Ewha Womans University

    Hyungsub Choi,
    Professor, School of Liberal Arts, Seoul National University of Science & Technology

    Chaired by Victor Seow, Professor, Department of History of Science, Harvard University

    2019 Oct 03

    Transcending the Frontier: Aesthetic Encounters Between North and South Korea in the Twilight of the Cold War

    4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Thomas Chan-Soo Kang Room (S050), CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, MA 02138

    Korea Colloquium
    10.3 KC Poster

    Douglas Gabriel
    Soon Young Kim Postdoctoral Fellow, Korea Institute, Harvard University

    Douglas Gabriel is the 2019–20 Soon Young Kim Postdoctoral Fellow at the Korea Institute, Harvard University. He received his...

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    2019 Sep 26

    Late Chosŏn Literati Voices on Dissent and Individual Autonomy

    4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Belfer Case Study Room (S020), CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, MA 02138

    Wagner Special Lecture
    9.26 Wagner Special Lecture Poster
    Marion Eggert, Professor, The Korean Studies Department at Bochum University, Germany

    Dr. Marion Eggert has studied Chinese Studies, Japanese Studies and Cultural Anthropology at the universities of Heidelberg and Munich, Nanjing University, and Sungkyunkwan University. She received her doctorate in Sinology in 1992, spent a year as a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Korea Institute (1994-5) and finished her "Habilitation“ in 1998. In 1996, she received the Max Weber Award from the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities for her dissertation. Since 1999 she is professor of Korean Studies at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany. In 2019, she was elected into the Academia Europeae. She has published on Chinese and Korean thought and literature of late imperial and modern times, her topics including poetry and poetics, dream culture, travelogues, and historiography. Among her main interests are the production and circulation of knowledge, and formations of subjectivity in pre-modern Korea.

    She served as dean of the faculty for East Asian Studies at Ruhr University Bochum 2002-2004, as deputy director of the Research Department CERES (Center for Religious Studies) at RUB from 2010 to 2013, and as president of the Association of Korean Studies in Europe since April 2019.

    Chaired by Sun Joo Kim, Harvard-Yenching Professor of Korean History; Director, Korea Institute, Harvard University|

    Abstract
    Confucian tradition is often described as producing a “collectivist” mentality, as lacking the resources necessary for developing a sense of individual autonomy, and thus as averse to the voicing of dissent in defiance of political authority and independent of bonds  of personal loyalty. Given that Chosŏn Korea defined itself as Confucian state, literati culture of that period should be expected to disdain expressions of dissent. The well-known history of intense intellectual debates among Chosŏn literati runs counter to this expectation. Two arguments can serve to resolve this seeming contradiction: either that these disputes should be seen as pure power struggle; or that they revolved around orthodoxy and thus in fact attest to the Confucian abhorrence of dissenting opinions. While acknowledging the explanatory power of both arguments, this paper sets out to test a third option: that the above-mentioned assumptions about Confucian attitudes towards dissent are incomplete. Based on non-fictional texts most of which were part of a philosophical (or otherwise intellectual) controversy, I will provide a sample of the ways in which Chosŏn literati talked about dissent, dispute and discord. Attention is directed not to the points of contention themselves, but rather to the ways in which the fact of dissent is verbalized, narrated and evaluated, with an emphasis on statements about the legitimacy of maintaining and defending personal convictions that run counter to group consensus. It will be demonstrated that Chosŏn literati culture allowed for strong statements of moral and intellectual autonomy in disregard of status, power, and prestige.

    Supported by the Edward Willett Wagner Memorial Fund at the Korea Institute, Harvard University

    2019 Sep 24

    Japan and the Future of the Korean Peninsula

    12:30pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie-Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street

    Weatherhead Center Program on U.S-Japan Relations Presentation, co-sponsored by the Harvard Korea Institute's SBS Foundation Research Fund

    Narushige Michishita, Vice President; Director of Security and International Studies Program; Director of Strategic Studies Program; Director of Maritime Safety and Security Policy Program; Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.

    Moderated by Susan Pharr, Director, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations; Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Politics, Department of Government...

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    2019 Apr 22

    Writing Asian America: A Reading and Conversation with Three Poets

    4:15pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    S030, Doris and Ted Lee Gathering Room, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge, MA 02138

    Asian American Studies Seminar Series; Sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center and co-sponsored by the Korea Institute and Asian American Studies Working Group
    4/22 Poetry Panel

    Tamiko Beyer
    The author of the poetry collections ...

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    2019 Apr 11

    Engineering the Moral Heart: Science and Literature in Postwar North Korea

    4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Thomas Chan-Soo Kang Room (S050), CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street

    Korea Colloquium
    4/11 KC

    Dafna Zur
    Assistant Professor, Korean Literature and Culture, Stanford University; Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures

    Dafna Zur teaches courses on Korean literature,...

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    2019 Apr 05

    Babies, Work, or Both? Highly-Educated Women's Employment and Fertility in Japan and South Korea

    12:15pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Thomas Chan-Soo Kang Room (S050), CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street

    Asia Beyond the Headlines Seminar Series, Harvard University Asia Center; co-sponsored by the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies and the Korea Institute
    4/5 Poster

    Mary Brinton
    Reischauer Institute Professor of Sociology; Director, Reischauer Institute of Japanese...

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    2019 Mar 26

    Preserving Asia's Colonial and Modern Architectural Heritage

    4:15pm to 6:15pm

    Location: 

    Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    Harvard-Yenching Institute Annual Roundtable; co-sponsored with the Asia Center, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, the Korea Institute and the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute

    Chao-Ching Fu
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Architecture, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan

    Hyon-sob Kim
    Professor, Department of Architecture, Korea University, South Korea

    Chen Liu
    Professor, School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, China; HYI Visiting Scholar 2018-19

    Thant Myint-U
    Writer, Historian,...

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    2019 Mar 07

    From March First to April 19th: Enacting Memories of Anticolonial Resistance in Cold War South Korea

    4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Thomas Chan-Soo Room (S050), CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street

    Special Korea Colloquium (100th Anniversary of March 1st Movement)
    3.7 Korea Colloquium

    Charles R. Kim
    Korea Foundation Associate Professor of Korean Studies, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Charles Kim is...

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    2019 Feb 28

    Hanoi Summit: The Start of Real Negotiations?

    10:00am to 11:30am

    Location: 

    T-520 Nye A (Taubman Building, Harvard Kennedy School)

    Harvard Korea Working Group Speaker Series; co-sponsored by SBS Foundation Research Fund at the Korea Institute

    With the Hanoi Summit now confirmed, the Belfer Center will be convening a Harvard Korea Working Group Speaker Series event to assess summit outcomes.

    Katharine H.S. Moon, Professor of Political Science and the Wasserman Chair of Asian Studies, Wellesley College; Nonresident Senior Fellow, Center for East Asia Policy, The Brookings Institution
    John Park, Director, Korea Project and Adjunct Lecturer in...

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